Tagged: value

5 tips to get the best sale price for your business

You need to plan to get out of your business, just like you need a plan to get into business.

There are 3 ways to leave your business:

  1. Sell
  2. Merge
  3. Close

Planning to sell is actually more important in some ways and slightly more complicated than starting up business.  It requires foresight, strategising and careful implementation.

Your efforts will help get the best return possible for all of those years of hard work!!!

Sold 7.3.17 PixabayHere are 5 tips to consider when selling your business:

1)      Sell at the right time for the right reasons

In most cases you’ll get the best result selling your business when sales are climbing and profits are strong.  If you have a history of solid performance it would be a good idea to consider selling before trouble strikes.

On the other hand, if you’ve been through troubled times but things have turned a corner, you may be best to hold onto the business and get things in order to be able to provide at least 1 -2 years of strong performance history before looking to sell.  Remember, prospective buyers will not pay for potential.

External factors which may influence the timing of your sale include availability of financing, changes in tax and other relevant laws, industry changes, the general economic climate and interest rate trends.  How are they impacting your business?

2)      Decide what you’re selling

Determine what the assets of your business are that have value that someone else is willing to pay for.  Selling a business often includes assets such as goodwill, trademarks and client lists/history as well as the physical assets.

If you’re looking to sell to an existing business they may consider your client list to be the most valuable part of the transaction and may not even need to take on your assets.  On the other hand, a stand-alone buyer may need to take over everything required to make the business run.

If your business is incorporated, you also need to decide if you are going to sell your business as an asset sale (where you sell everything in the corporation but not the incorporated company itself) or a share sale (where you sell everything including your incorporated company).

3)      Determine what your business is actually worth

Buyers are interested in profits, not revenue, and cash flow is usually more important than profits when valuing small businesses.

Consider the business’s ability to sell, its readiness and your timing. There are many attributes that can make your business appear more attractive, including:

  • Increasing profits
  • Consistent income figures
  • A strong customer base
  • A major contract that spans several years

There are several different business valuation methods. No one approach can be used in isolation; the current market, economic trends and what other similar businesses have sold for also need to be taken into account.

4)      Make sure your house is in order

Prepare your business ahead of time, preferably at least a year or two beforehand.  The preparation time will allow you to improve your financial records, business structure and customer base to make your business more profitable and appealing to potential buyers.

Even if you decide not to sell straight away, you will personally reap the benefits and ultimately will increase your future selling price = win/win.

5)      Get professional advice

Selling your business arguably could be a bigger event than selling your family home, so do yourself a favour and get professional advice along the way.

 

 

Use Xero Tracking to “join the dots” and move your business forward

Knowing exactly how your business is performing NOW is arguably one of the biggest keys to improving your business performance in the future.

With the development of cloud accounting, all the information is at your fingertips on a timely basis. You just need to use it!

Case study: Retail shop owner wants to better understand shop sales and usage of employees.

Business owners start to know this kind of information in their head ie how much the shop would generally take on any given day.  However, it’s not much use to anyone up there!

Action: With a few changes to the data entry process, this information can easily be gathered, tracked and then reported on using the xero accounting system.

I have recently set up xero to track “daily shop sales” for my client.  By also using the timesheet function, we can then start to report the use of employees v the revenue brought into the business on any given day.

Benefits: These changes will enable us to see –

  • Which days generally bring in more revenue than others
  • Which days typically require more labour
  • Which (if any) employees are more productive than others
  • How many sales (quantity) were made on a particular day
  • What the average sale was on any given day (and any period of time)

Value: The business owner is now better equipped to determine rostering requirements and potentially save money on days where additional labour is not required, or perhaps schedule time for themselves on those quieter days to conduct any training and work ON growing the business.

Ultimately,  by tracking the $ value of sales, # of customers in the store and the average value of each sale we can also now track the effectiveness of any sales strategies that are implemented.

Worthwhile exercise don’t you think?!

Take Home: What could you be tracking in your business to help you “join the dots” and move your business forward?